Thursday, July 29, 2021

{what he said}

 

meet me here - where wild teasels grow

& common daisies preen, queen's glow

where wild flowers tarry & slow

blazing king's row, blazing king's row


you glide in, butterfly bright coat

i am bare as half moon, my throat

a bait & you took all - you stoat!

left me in moat, left me in moat



Butterfly at wild teasel
Grace@Everydayamazing


Posted for dVerse poets pub - Poetry Form, MonoTetra, which was developed by Michael Walker.  Had a fun time writing this one.  Thank you for your visits and comments.


20 comments:

  1. This is exquisitely drawn, Grace! 💝💝 Such natural rhythm and flow in your stanzas. I especially admire the image of "butterfly bright coat."

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  2. So beautiful, colorful in poetic imagery; and the final few lines reveal a tragedy and devastation. Love this, Grace! <3

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  3. Love the description of the garden meeting place....and then to learn it's a butterfly! Excellent rhyming and rhythm too....went so well with the meaning/story of the poem I was not aware of the form. Enjoyed this very much!

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  4. I like your floral first stanza. Reminds me of Robin Goodfellow.

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  5. This has the rhythm, flow and feeling of an old folklore song. Beautifully written! 🌼

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  6. So lovely ... until the moat. I thought surely there must be a second meaning for moat, but alas I find none and our heroine is left in a moat?!

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  7. Anticipation to devastation! Exquisitely penned!

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  8. ove how the nature has been intertwined, our basis of life!

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  9. Love how the nature has been intertwined, our basis of life!

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  10. Grace, I think that's the first time I've seen teasel in a poem. I learned about them when I took a wool spinning class many moons ago. They used them to tease wool apart in the olden days. Lovely poem!

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  11. Nature's beauty captured so wonderfully.

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  12. the first stanza silently screams of royalty - a clever nod to Monarch butterflies. and the tragedy in the last stanza is so tenderly presented. genius in few words, Grace.

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  13. You took a difficult, constrained form, and made it sing. Well done!

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  14. So colorful and melodious, especially for this type of form.

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