Wednesday, October 7, 2015

Gifts of African Night Sky





by barren land
ancient trees gnarled by storm dust
rise with garland 
& dress shimmering of silver raindrops-
tonight, she dances under diamond-lit sky



~0~0~



love the trees 
as your beloved children,
said her grandmother to her-
so she planted trees until her last day
tonight, she hears their music for the gods




~0~0~


think for yourself
and question everything,
her teacher told her-
so she broke bread with friends & strangers
tonight, under sea of stars, she writes





Posted for D'verse Poets Pub - Gifts hosted by Ahbra Pal ~
and Poets United - Teacher, hosted by Susan 
Thanks for the visit ~

29 comments:

  1. Good on her, I think that between the planting of trees (which makes for a great metaphor) and the eating with friends and strangers that she would be one I would enjoy to live life with. Nice progression in this as well Grace. I felt each added another layer to her story.

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  2. ... doing that all the time ... sharing my bread with strangers and friends, I mean, smiles ... there is no other way ... Love, cat.

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  3. Can learn many a thing from strangers and lending a little helping hand

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  4. "love the trees
    as your beloved children,
    said her grandmother to her-" I love this Grace - a beautful and soulful reflection.....

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  5. 'Think for yourself and question everything' is a wonderful gift to be given - and writing well i am sure all the teachers who contributed to that are in some way reading and smiling

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  6. I love how "tonight" links the tree's dance, the planting of trees and hearing their music in her last days, and, finally, writing as the sharing of communion among friends and strangers. Your view of teaching is all pervasive--the only way to avoid it is to lose our connection to the trees. I love this and its early life, African location. You move me to tears of joy.

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  7. tonight beautifully links them all in different layers..."love the trees / as your beloved children,/ said her grandmother to her-"...beautiful...

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  8. Man, I love that title. Awesome set-up.

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    Replies
    1. I love this:
      "ancient trees gnarled by storm dust
      rise with garland
      & dress shimmering of silver raindrops"

      And the one about planting and investing in trees so that one day their fruit/voices can be savored.

      My favorite thing about these is the way you made the word "tonight" the support for each mini-poem/stanza. It really makes me think about making the most of "tonight" every time I get the chance. You know, we wake up every morning with the intentions of doing better, of making it a great day. But by the evening, we're pretty exhausted. What if we had that same attitude in the evening (in addition to or instead)? I'm so going to do this tonight ... you know, be intentional about reading to my kids, playing, hanging with hubs, etc. Thank you!

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    2. Also, the italicized words make up a hidden message. And it speaks of living in the now and forgetting the past. Just focus on this moment rather than any hurts that have been previously caused and then have gone unforgiven. This is a poem of starting over, it seems to me.

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    3. Thanks for your thoughtful comments S ~ I appreciate them ~

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  9. Glorious words, which drew me in. I drank deeply. Thank you, friend.

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  10. Such beauty and wisdom in this piece.. indeed one should also think of himself and question wherever necessary. Beautifully penned!

    Lots of love,
    Sanaa

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  11. Wonderfully played Grace. The give and take relarionship between friends and strangers. I guess night time is the perfect time to learn

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  12. To grow trees
    instead of cutting
    down is a way
    up
    instead
    of
    down..

    To grow
    up is to live..
    to grow
    down
    is to die..

    Grow
    is living
    up or
    down..:)

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  13. "Think for yourself and question everything"...that is a wise teacher there. I love those ancient trees under a diamond-lit sky...gorgeous.

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  14. Lovely Grace and love all about Africa ..:)
    Love the tittle too :)

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  15. Oh I love that second stanza.. love the trees as children.. maybe the best legacy we can leave when we depart.. you can really paint magic with your words.

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  16. Love the last two stanzas Grace--there is a lot of magic here~!

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  17. How important it is to try to make the world a better place for you have been here; Whether it is by planting trees, teaching, helping others and in so many other ways. Beautiful poem Grace.

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  18. love the trees
    as your beloved children

    Such classic words from elders will be very much a guide and an assertion that can change our thinking. In so doing it can change our lives for the better. Great lines Grace!

    Hank

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  19. These all carry an air of sacredness to them, Grace...so touching.

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  20. These are so lovely, gentle, sensitive. They refer to the things which are important to learn. So nice Grace.

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  21. Someone taught you well. (The poem is autobiographical, or at least has autobiographical threads, does it not?)

    To Teach the Humble

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  22. Just beautiful, Grace. The progression is wonderful.

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  23. There is a musical cadence to the words that impart a magical quality.

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  24. such fine teachers we find in unexpected places.
    A lovely poem Grace.

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  25. A wonderful triad here, Grace...the trees, dancing under stars; the voice of the trees as music for gods; writing (reflecting) under a sea of stars. All the earth and sky seem drawn together by the human mind that arises in the last lines. I so enjoyed this--the idea especially. Very well done.
    Steve K.

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Thank you for your comments and visit. I appreciate them ~