Thursday, October 8, 2015

Black moths, white fear


                                                     Carlos Amorales




We are drawn to the light
to soothe our coal-inked wings
singed by fumes & polluted air
we inhale heat behind walls

to soothe our coal-inked wings
and lighten talons of fear
staking our ebony chests

singed by fumes & polluted air
we swarm as clouds, our bodies 
hovering dry-pitted earth

we inhale heat behind walls
to garnish our lithium eyes
long blinded by chemical dust



Posted for D'verse Poets Pub - Trimeric form hosted by Mary ~  Thanks for the visit ~

Notes of this art installation:   Black Cloud can be understood as a cautionary tale if we go back to the years of the British Industrial Revolution in the mid-nineteenth century, when the grizzly environment, tinged by coal combustion, originated a natural selection of black moths in the cities. The typical moth in England prior to the Industrial Revolution was the dominant light-coloured form which made it very difficult for birds and other predators to see it against light-coloured trees and clean walls. The coal that was burned as industry spread throughout the north of England blanketed the countryside with black soot and a new dark form of moth emerged. It appeared suddenly, came to dominate the population in industrial areas, and then declined just as sharply following the closure of coal mines and many industrial centres. Pollution levels dropped, clean air laws were introduced, and the sootiness that prevailed during the nineteenth century disappeared from the cities. Dramatically, as the cleaner, lighter conditions returned, so did the lighter form of the moth. Some biologists suggest that the dark moths will soon be extinct.             

25 comments:

  1. Wow, never knew that about the moths. I guess less pollution isn't good for at least one species

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  2. Very interesting information about the black moth, Grace. What the black soot did to the moths was undoubtedly the same thing done to the miners' lungs. Definitely a cautionary tale!

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  3. First I found the poem wonderful, and read more of a metaphor from it, which made the explanation even stronger.. somehow poems written with the collective we make me feel included.. am I also a black moth? Really a wonderful piece.

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    1. That is a wonderful question Bjorn ~ In a way, we are all changed by environment where are living today ~ Thanks ~

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  4. Your epilogue explication really enhanced the second reading of this terrific Eco-poetic. Bjorn's inquiry is significant, & loved your response. I like the lines /we swarm as clouds, our bodies/hovering dry-pitted earth/.

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  5. Intriguing. I didn't know about these black moths. With or without the explanation, I like the intricacies of your verse, particularly in this bit: "to soothe our coal-inked wings/and lighten talons of fear".
    -HA

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  6. Canaries mine SinG daRk tUnes
    Lives dArk.. always paRt..
    Separation myth..
    Unity Real..

    Lives dArk always paRt..
    Real is all.. all is light..
    DaRk comes.. goes..

    Separation myth..
    always lie..
    Truth ALLthatiS...

    Unity Real..
    Now is woN
    oNe is Now..

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  7. Such a world of depth in this poem.... truly commendable!

    Lots of love,
    Sanaa

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  8. Interesting to read the poem first and then read it again once we know what the black moths are and how they appeared. It certainly still resonates today.

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  9. That's very interesting background on the adaptation of moths. Thank you for sharing.

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  10. I've always been intrigued by the colour change of those moths. Great piece!

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  11. That's quite a damning indictment of our times. Even though no black moth has emerged, times are tough for many species. Loved it!

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  12. wonderful wordsmithing...I know I will be coming back to read this again

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  13. that's a telling tale and cautionary too...love your title...

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  14. We treat our planet soooo badly.

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  15. So interesting... wonder what's in store for man?

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  16. Oh, the imagery here is delightful! Well done!!

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  17. Powerfully written, Grace. Such effective visuals.

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  18. Much knowledge and concern in a lovely poem, Grace. I appreciate the information you provided, and began to wonder how soon our skin tones will darken.

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  19. Such a chilling reminder, Grace. It reminds me of a book by Barbara Kingsolver, "Flight Behavior," about the plight of Monarch Butterflies--developed as an extended metaphor for the protagonist's life. Yikes.

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  20. A strong piece - well drawn and edifying.

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  21. Hmmm, moths r us? I enjoyed both the poem and the astonishing tale behind it.

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  22. Wow, Grace, your trimeric is stark...and powerful! Title and artwork grab attention to drive your point.

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  23. Interesting piece about adaptation to the environment around you--if pollution caused the rise of black moths then I will nay mourn their passing.

    I had to look up the form of a trimeric Grace, you make it seem so smooth and effort less with yoru construct. Nicely done as usual.

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