Tuesday, February 24, 2015

Dear White Knight



Sculpture by Stephen Fitz-Gerald


I have been missing you
-your silver lance & sword
Are you on your way to Camelot?

To fight for king's flag, royal blue 
To avenge wrongs denied, without rewards 
I have been missing you-

Your gallant words, fearless imbued 
Your firm grip on your shield of beliefs, a fort
Are you on your way to Camelot?

Has another lady won your heart in grief ?
The journey is long, forked with rivers distorted
I have been missing you

The winter's light is frail dew    
And my knees are cold kneeling on hard board 
Are you on your way?   To Camelot

Where the bravest of men fight & show 
Honor.  The tournament has started 
I am missing you
in Camelot.  Have you lost your way?


Yours truly,



Lady from Norwich (In) Distress

Posted for D'verse Poets Pub -  Theme is medieval tourney ~ Thanks for the visit ~

32 comments:

  1. those who love never lose their way - aren't they?
    and how could they not defend the city they call home and those that find shelter...
    the villanelle form works excellent here with the repetition grace...

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  2. Oh, I do hope he is on his way to Camelot in time for the tourney! Hope he has not been swayed by some other lady along the way!

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  3. Oh what a wonderful beautiful Villanelle, and how great to write it as a letter.. I wonder if he will come for his lady in distress :-)

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  4. I love how you chose to take the theme and make it your own! Clever…and sad. I hope he finds his way back to her. Thanks for sharing your talent! Have a great week!

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  5. I adore this! Love the repetition which so totally works.

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  6. I hope the lady's distress can soon be eased. Great medieval feel in this villanelle, Grace.

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  7. Oh that's a wonderful poem that catches perfectly the era with both its words and style :)

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  8. sometimes those knights do fall...and the ones we believe in most
    never make it, fallen prey, the good guys do not always win like in the movies...that is reality...but until we know for sure, we can hope....

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  9. Yes, it seems I've been missing my white knight too! Lovely thoughts, and knightly enjoyable.

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  10. the variation on the repeated lines works wonderfully in this...especially that last, plaintive "have you lost your way?"

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  11. Hopefully his gallant steed has picked up a rock in his hoof, slowing his return, and he'll arrive in time to take her scarf.

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  12. hmmm, if I guy ain't worried about making it back to his dear lady, he's gettin' it from another strapping woman.... let's hope he finds his way and I'm just thinking a bit too modern... sniles

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  13. Very nice, Grace. I hope he finds his way.

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  14. Her expectations are a bit conflicting, are they not ... If he was home bound he was not a knight. And if he went for the fight, he would not be a husband. I say, it is not easy to be a man.

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  15. Have to get back to Camelot and that roundtable

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  16. Everyone is always looking to their white knights to fight the black knights and wretched wars. Maybe some day we can just live in harmony and without the tortures of saying out possible last good-byes.

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  17. The longing (and worry) of women when men go off to war - that hasn't changed. Of course, now a days the roles can be reversed. I like the form used here as it seems appropriate for the time period. Of course, Camelot is a story I have ready numerous books on (each a bit different) but I love them all.

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  18. Multiple interpretations to this plaintive poem - abandonment, grieving, going off to war... melodiously done, and love the change in the last stanza.

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  19. The heroes knight is a long one in deed.. to rise with fair ladies in day of time.. and truly that never changes as there is only 24 hours in the day for knight or love..:)

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  20. Even like the lady we wait with bated breath...will he make it ?...it can happen either way....beautiful Grace...

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  21. The eternal search for the White Knight... so often, he leaves us disappointed. Still, we wait, and we hope, because of love.
    Love this line: "The winter's light is frail dew" really striking.

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  22. This captures the anxiety women often feel when men are away at war or doing dangerous jobs. The last stanza was so tender, it touched that place in me that knew exactly the woman's plea.

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  23. Lovely poem Grace..ah where is that white knight off saving the realm of Camelot.

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  24. Such longing in the repeated refrain, grace, such tenderness in the plea - and I love the sculpture you use for the illustration - very cool

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  25. I love how you use this form here in loneliness and pride--it could be sung by lady troubedours between the epic news songs they carry.

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  26. The journey to Camelot may be for all sorts of reasons, and there's a sense of that loss here--not jealousy--but a loss to a more high-powered kind of place--lovely cadence and flow. k. (Manicddaily)

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  27. I really like the repetition which adds a sense of urgency, concern and loneliness. A beautiful love letter.

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  28. perfectly suited for the prompt; you are indeed Lady Grace :). have a good weekend ~

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  29. For some reason the poems that I have read to the "medieval tourney" prompt, seem to conjure forth the strums of a lute, in my mind. Ladies and knights and chivalry: sigh - the stuff of storybook daydreams. A charming reverie.

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Thank you for your comments and visit. I appreciate them ~