Monday, October 31, 2016

No crying over the bridge

I cross the bridge several times that I have lost count.  But today is different.   As I prepare for the long journey, I say goodbye to what has been been my home for many years. In my mind, I am burning the wooden bridge to fire, casting away familiar roads and comfortable routines.  As the airplane lands at midnight on the new country,  fears for the future rises like dark clouds.  There will be storms.   And long winters of sadness. But there will also be springs and waterfalls to discover.   I inhale the air of uncertainty -it's electrifying.

Rushing waters cascade
over rocks & shallow pits-
wind trills and croaks
as I take a leap of faith
and ride the wings of change




Grace@ Albion Falls, Hamilton


Posted for D'verse Poets Pub - Haibun Monday.  The theme is about bridge/s.   Please join us when the pub opens at 3pm EST.   See you there!

24 comments:

  1. Ooh, I really like this: "I inhale the air of uncertainty -it's electrifying." That is consistently my favorite part of the haibun: the last sentence of the paragraph, the segue from the prose into the haiku/tanka. It typically contains some sort of little twist that really hooks me.

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  2. The natural fear of the unknown is devastating! Not to burn one's bridges lest one needs to go back again!

    Hank

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  3. Have to watch where you cross or you may never be able to go back.

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  4. The winds of change take us to some breathtaking places. Beautifully done, Grace.

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  5. I really like how the journey becomes a bridge to something new, at the same time as you burn the bridge of past...

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  6. Life is too short to fear crossing bridges. Live for adventure and that feeling of exhilaration.

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  7. 'I inhale the air of uncertainty -it's electrifying.'

    This is such a beautifully wise and profound write, Grace. Life no doubt is filled with change, and sometimes its nerve racking but as you mention, there are both springs and waterfalls.. to discover ❤️


    Lots of love,
    Sanaa

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  8. Lovely Grace.
    I have to apologise for pressing the enter button on the links before I entered this weeks haibun, if you can you can delete my first entry or read it for what it is....
    Have a great day...

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  9. Your words convey the nervous pain of new beginnings far from home. I like how you bridged the experience.

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  10. springs and waterfalls to discover. I inhale the air of uncertainty -it's electrifying.
    Lovely!!

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  11. The loss of what is left behind and the eagerness of what's waiting ahead.... penned well :)

    "as i take a leap of faith and ride the wings of change" beautiful again!

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  12. That move to a new country would be terrifying.I admire your courage to come to a new land.

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  13. I love how you've looked at bridges in different ways, starting with the familiar bridge, the known, and then 'burning the wooden bridge', saying goodbye to the familiar. I like the move from the smoke of burning bridges to the future rising like dark storm clouds, and the contrast pf 'long winters of sadness' and 'springs and waterfalls to discover', which then reappear in the tanka for your 'leap of faith'. Beautifully written, Grace!

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  14. Ha, another example of serendipity - that was exactly the way I thought of bridges in my poem (alas, not a haibun, so not linked up) - moving to a new culture, country, way of life. And the subtle observation of uncertainty as both exhilarating and frightening, a burning of excitement and destruction. Perfect.

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  15. This is here and now a very good reminder of why we move and what we do to move. Love it!

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  16. I love a work that raises the questions of 'what happened', what happened? to make the move? A new start and you are right. There is great expectation in the move...and what comes next...and perhaps this limits the sadness of what was? I love this, Grace, it evokes so much in me.

    Jane

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  17. Fear and excitement... and that is how it is. Lovely

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  18. It must be such a brave thing to be a migrant, and perhaps the heart is always divided. But perhaps also doubly rich?

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  19. It is amazing how we may cross a bridge literally thousands of times without thinking about it really. Then there is a time when we never go back..and we go on to new adventures....veey nice, Grace

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  20. There are two bridges that hold special meaning to me each time I cross them. Every single time. So this means a lot to me. Thank you! Enjoy your weekend :)

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  21. SMiLes.. rEminds me of how
    much we can literAlly take
    the bridge and infrastructure
    of culture to comfort.. until disaster
    strikes.. and in my area per Hurricane
    Ivan
    back
    in '04..
    the huge
    Interstate bridge..
    washed away by Nature roar..
    bigger bridges come now.. but
    Nature
    sTiLL
    hOlds
    ultiMaTE
    Bridges to Destruction..
    additionally Broken Bridges oF Trump Leaders too..;)

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  22. Such a beautiful and touching post.

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