Saturday, May 31, 2014

The art of the broken things



Today, I am a sharp point in middle
of everything -

flower beds
that need mending,

crowd with paperwork on table.
My hands are brittle dry

when a bowl crashes
on wooden floor, a blind spot

when you are driving the car
& don't check rear & side view mirrors.

What do you do?

You pour your paint
as you would

water delicate buds, 
giving everything that you have-

I trace the jagged lines
How beautiful they surge, 

gold-veins tracing 



sun's amber  
falls on cracks & ravines-
healing, i become more than beautiful 





Kintsugi (or kintsukuroi) is a Japanese method for repairing broken ceramics with a special lacquer mixed with gold, silver, or platinum. The philosophy behind the technique is to recognize the history of the object and to visibly incorporate the repair into the new piece instead of disguising it. The process usually results in something more beautiful than the original.


Posted for D'verse Poets Pub - Hosted by Mary ~ Thanks for the visit ~

40 comments:

  1. nice...i like the respect for the history in this methodology...too often we are willing to throw out the old and then them worthless instead of using our more modern ways to repair and make useful once more...

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  2. The symbolism of the cracked bowl and your words to explain it all - makes this extremely powerful..

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  3. It DOES result in something more beautiful. As, I suppose, is the same with humans, if we heal well. I loved this poem, and the entire idea behind it, Grace. Lovely.

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  4. Grace a truely delicate well written piece. >KB

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  5. nice symbolism with the gold veins on the cracked bowl - i think that once broken things have their very own beauty that sometimes outshines those that are whole

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  6. Sometimes on those difficult days a person just needs to take note of the beauty all around and breathe in and breathe out. I like the idea of making something more beautiful than the original, Grace.

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  7. Wonderful metaphor, great enjambment. Thanks, Grace. k.

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  8. Dear Grace,
    what a wonderful thougt and a very wise mataphor!
    Thank you for sharing
    Elisabeth

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  9. This is the second time this week that I have seen and read about kintsugi! The world is obviously trying to tell me something. A lovely poem, Grace. Here's to broken things and their beauty.

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  10. I've always felt that our wounds are the wombs of what we become in our life-long rebirthing. Such a wonderful way of putting it here.

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  11. I recognize the feeling, Grace! There are days like that. Things pile up and, just when you think nothing could go worse, you are proved wrong. But I like the way you react by making something more beautiful.

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  12. Beautiful.. how those gold lines of healing make you more beautiful.
    Such a gentle and heart-warming write.. :-)
    -HA

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  13. That is such a wonderful way of repairing things. Sounds rather expensive, but absolutely exquisite.

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  14. Really a wonderful way of acknowledging the injury and the strength that comes out of a repair--smiles to you!

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  15. Things we can mend indeed, just may take a long while sometimes

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  16. I love this Grace really besutiful!

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  17. A natural pattern emerged in lines of art. That's just beautiful. 'Conservation' has to come with a passion and a compassion for the arts. You did very well in mending and in informing! Thanks for sharing Grace!

    Hank

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  18. Life itself is a jagged line. Many evenings are a result of a morning plan fractured.

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  19. Wow, poem with haiku--haibun end-- is twice as beautiful! Room for gold outlining all of its wrinkles and Knicks in time.

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  20. Sometimes our scars do make us more beautiful. Perfection is boring!
    I was interested to find out the technique for repairing pottery. It brings a wonderful, unique look to the bowl.
    I really appreciate your kind comment on my poem for my father at Poetry of the Netherworld.

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  21. I am reminded of the old wood-shop adage, the glued joint is stronger than the wood - and the human heart can be so too

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  22. The philosophy of a comitted recyclist and artist. Enhance the mistakes and fractures,creating new and better pieces.

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  23. Kintsugi is such a beautiful practice....with such profound meaning....and I love how you have captured this in 'the art of broken things.'

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  24. This is such a beautiful poem, Grace. I love how when you've got so much clamouring for your attention, you show tough love, & ignore it. And tend yourself as you repair the bowl. So peaceful. - Vivienne, of OneVoicePoetry

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  25. The bowl is quite beautiful as are your words. How true that something repaired often ends up better than that that was before...
    Anna :o]

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  26. I do love the concept of kintsukuroi... you have illustrated the beauty of broken treasures with poignant grace.

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  27. oh, i just love this, from that gorgeous title, through to the last word. and i love the concept of kintsugi as well, what a lovely way to honor the broken places.






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  28. "I trace the jagged lines
    How beautiful they surge,

    gold-veins tracing " is epic Grace.. I too wrote a poem about Kintsugi last year it's a gift to a poet, for sure... With Best Wishes Scott

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  29. Grace,
    What a beautiful rendition of the idea. I'd never heard of this "healing" method. The last phrases are just great. Nice work.
    Steve K. (And thanks for the heads up on OLN!)

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  30. I have never heard of Kintsugi before but I am highly intrigued by the concept. Something more beautiful than before coming out of something broken. That can be a metaphor for us as well...

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  31. That repair technique is very cool. Perhaps we would all be more beautiful too, if we acknowledged our scars and recognized how they make us better.

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  32. Grace,

    A lovely poem that can be taken in many ways. I like the thought of broken
    things being fixed.

    healing I become more beautiful..absolute favorite line..

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  33. Oh Grace,
    me again! Thank you so much for your nice visit and you lovely comment!!! Wonderful to have you around!
    Have a sunny sunday
    Elisabeth

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  34. delicate and lovely, Grace - have a good week ~

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  35. thanks for sharing kintsugi with poem and photo...beauty in our brokeness, yes

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  36. I love this concept, and the way you have written about it.

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  37. Each of us is a kind of broken person and it is that brokenness that made us into kinder, more compassionate beings.

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  38. What a great way to look at broken things.

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  39. I have never heard of Kintsugi, but I love the idea! That bowl displayed does look wonderful with the golden traces of the broken pieces. That is so beautiful! And I love the idea to repair things instead of buying something new, spending money on it and wasting the old stuff - making the repaired one even more beautiful than before is an amazing bonus! :) The poem is a perfect match to the bowl, so beautiful as well!

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